West Virginia Design Schools

West Virginia is home to a number of design firsts. Did you know that one of the first suspension bridges in the world was erected in 1849 in Wheeling, WV? The first electric railroad in the world was built in here and the first brick street on the world was laid in Charleston, WV. And talk about art and design — West Virginia is home to the world’s only residence made entirely of coal. Occupied on June 1, 1961, Coal House is located in White Sulphur Springs, WV. With an abundance of unique and innovate design within the borders, it’s no wonder the state is also home to some of the nation’s top design schools.

The Department of Design at West Virginia University and Concord University- Department of Design are the state’s pride and joy when it comes to design programs. Established in 1867 (WVU) and 1872 (Concord), these popular institutions enroll roughly 200 hand-picked design students each year. Overall, the state has a total undergraduate student population of nearly more than 100,000. These students attend the 23 public and 21 private institutions. Across the nation, undergraduate art and design school enrollment is 110,273.

WVU, Concord and other West Virginia design schools offer degree programs ranging from architecture to sculpture. Design students may earn a degree in graphic design, interior design, web design, drawing, illustration, multimedia and film, ceramics, jewelry making, photography, printmaking, metalsmithing, and painting. The costs for these programs vary by school, but on average, design students can expect to shell out around $4,377 per academic year at a public school $15,296 per academic year at a private school.

Fortunately, tuition rates are lower than the national average. The average tuition for public four-year schools across the nation is $5,950. For private schools, students pay $21,588 on average. West Virginia students may pay even less by completing all or part of the degree program online. Online students save a significant amount of money each year by eliminating room and board costs as well as transportation. Room and board costs average around $7,049 per academic year.

To get started on a design career, you should select a school. If you would like to explore options outside of the top schools listed above, you can browse through listings by visiting college directories or college ranking websites such as U.S. News & World Report or Design-schools.us. After you have selected several options, be sure to visit the school’s official website to begin the application process. Most directories and ranking websites feature links to each school’s official website.

Interior Design Ideas – How to Make Corridors and Landings Look Elegant

By the judicious selection of wall colors you can visually change the proportions of a corridor. To push out the side walls select colors that recede, and for a corridor to appear shorter add an advancing color to the end wall.

Mirrors fixed to side walls will magically open up the space and make it appear much wider and lighter. These can be in the form of sheets made into a wall of mirror or in panels placed between doors. Cut to shape, mirrors can be used to back recesses/niches, and framed sections can be hung at intervals.

The placement of an item of interest at the end of the corridor will have the effect providing a focal point as well as stopping the eye. You may choose to display a piece of sculpture, a stone urn or perhaps a decorative vase on a plinth. A stunning framed painting, stenciled walls or a trompe l’oeil painted effect will serve a similar purpose, as will an item of exquisite furniture.

Floor coverings that emphasize the horizontal will also help to break up the space. A continuous carpet that has a trellis pattern or is divided into panels will be effective, as will individual area rugs placed at intervals on to either a hard floor or fitted carpet.

Interest can also be created on side walls by hanging pictures. Not only will they make your passage through the space more pleasurable, but the reflective surface of their glass fronts will help to bounce around whatever natural light is available. A decorator’s tip to stabilize pictures hanging in a traffic area is to fix each picture at two points (that is, with two hooks) instead of one.

Structurally breaking up the space may involve only slightly more work. The creation of arches along your corridor will not only break the ‘journey’ but will also provide an attractive frame through which to view the scene beyond.

The key to a winning scheme may well lie with some existing possession. A tribal runner carpet, a particularly dominant painting, an exotic screen or a gorgeous piece of painted furniture – any of these items could be used as a trigger for a successful scheme. By picking out and repeating a color element from your furnishings, you will instantly draw attention to them and give them a sense of belonging.

On the matter of safety it is important for sufficient light to be provided to signal any changes of floor level, and that lights can be switched on and off at either end of a corridor (that is, two-way switched). It also is essential that loose floor coverings be well attached to the underfloor (special webbings are available for loose carpers placed on either hard or soft floorings), and for hard floor surfaces to be non-slip, especially where there are children or elderly people in residence.

Traditional Japanese Interior Design – Bamboo

If you’ve ever seen tall stalks of golden bamboo in a grove or in photographs, you might be surprised to learn that it is a grass. A very fast growing, tall grass. While ‘dwarf’ bamboo grows to less than a foot, some species actually grow 100 feet tall!

Bamboo is attractive, pliable and sturdy, and is the preferred plant used in the making of wicker furniture. (It’s also provides the preferred food of the Giant Panda, but that’s a different story.)

Once the wood has been properly treated to prevent insect infestation, bamboo forms a very tough hardwood that can be used in fences, canes, toys, musical instruments, clothing, and much more, including decorative baskets.

Bamboo grows in many countries around the world, such as China, Japan and Indonesia, and each country has its own traditional method of weaving baskets. So if you’re thinking of adding a decorative bamboo basket or two to your home decor, you can go with traditional designs of your own area, or purchase something unique from another country.

Baskets woven from bamboo are works of art in their own right, and can stand on their own as decorative pieces. But they are above all functional, and can be used for a variety of purposes, from holding various knicknackery to setting off plants or flowers placed within.

Don’t just go into a local store and buy the first basket you see. If you search the web you can find hundreds of examples of intricately woven baskets that will amaze you with their beauty. Even if your home is not furnished with an ‘Oriental motif,’ a traditional Japanese basket is such a unique work of art that it will stand out and complement its surroundings.

Because bamboo baskets can be so beautiful, it’s no surprise that it takes a long time to learn the craft. It can take artists up to ten years just to learn to master the art of bamboo weaving. However, if you like to create your own baskets, don’t despair, there are plenty of resources which will show you how to work with bamboo.

Books such as The Basket Book: Over 30 Magnificent Baskets to Make and Enjoy, Handmade Baskets: From Nature’s Colorful Materials, and The Craft & Art of Bamboo: Projects for Home and Garden are written for the beginner and have simple designs to start with.

On the internet, bamboocraft is a website chock-full of links to every possible subject you could want to know about bamboo and the art of working with it and creating everything from furniture to baskets to clothing! It includes a message forum so like-minded artisans can get together to exchange stories, hints and techniques.

The American Bamboo Society americanbamboo is another excellent resource – and it provides links to societies around the world, from Mexico to Europe to Australia to China and Japan. There’s a vast network out there for those who’d like to learn how to make beautiful bamboo baskets…or appreciate those who have.